Great South Wall
Poolbeg at Dusk


Poolbeg at Dusk

25th March 2012

From the seafront at Clontarf, Dublin

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon17-40mm 37mm
1sec
100
f11
Neutral Density Filter

 

 


 
Starburst


Starburst

18th March 2012

Poolbeg Lighthouse, Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

The rays of the evening sun reflecting off the lighthouse window to give a "Starburst" effect

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 40mm
0.6sec
100
22 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Pink Hues at the Lighthouse


Pink Hues at the Lighthouse

18th March 2012

Poolbeg Lighthouse, Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Some gentle pink hues in the sky at dusk .

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
13secs
100
f11
Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Evening Glow


Evening Glow

18th March 2012

Poolbeg Lighthouse, Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

With the Hill of Howth in the background.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall across the bay at Clontarf.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 27mm
10secs
100
f11
Neutral density filter

 

 


 
A New Day Dawns, at Great South Wall


A New Day Dawns ,at Great South Wall.

16th March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
.60s
100 f13 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Sunrise at Poolbeg Lighthouse


Sunrise at Poolbeg Lighthouse

16th March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 40mm
1/13s
200 f9 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
The Big Chimneys

The Big Chimneys

16th March 2012

Poolbeg, Dublin Port

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/160s
400 f5 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Sunrise at Half Moon Swimming Club.


Sunrise at Half Moon Swimming Club

3rd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.   This is the Half Moon Swimming and Water Polo Club at Great South Wall, and I took this shot around 730am.

The Half Moon Swimming Club was founded in 1898 at the Great South Wall in Dublin. It was known then as "The Poolbeg Bathers Association". In the years that followed, the name was changed to Half Moon Swimming Club to reflect more accurately the fact that members of the club were participating in swimming competitions held at the time. What is now the clubhouse sits approximately halfway along the Great South Wall, built originally in an area known as Poolbeg, to create a shipping channel into Dublin Port. It was once a station for an army gun battery whose function was to protect the entrance to the port. The gun turret was mounted in a 'half moon' shape, thus lending to the name of the club Consequently, the clubhouse is referred to as 'the Wall', 'the Poolbeg', 'the Battery', or 'the Half Moon'

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/25
100 f11 tripod . Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Sunrise at Great South Wall, Dublin


Sunrise at Great South Wall

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.   This is the Half Moon Swimming and Water Polo Club at Great South Wall, and I took this shot around 730am.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 24mm
1/8
100 f11 tripod . Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Great South Wall, Dublin


Great South Wall, Dublin

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin, facing Dublin port.  I took this shot about half-way down the wall.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.   This shot was taken aprrox half way down the wall, facing Dublin port and Poolbeg chimneys.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/8
100 f11 tripod . Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Club-house, Half Moon Swimming Club


Club house, Half Moon Swimming Club

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.

The Half Moon Swimming Club was founded in 1898 at the Great South Wall in Dublin. It was known then as "The Poolbeg Bathers Association". In the years that followed, the name was changed to Half Moon Swimming Club to reflect more accurately the fact that members of the club were participating in swimming competitions held at the time. What is now the clubhouse sits approximately halfway along the Great South Wall, built originally in an area known as Poolbeg, to create a shipping channel into Dublin Port. It was once a station for an army gun battery whose function was to protect the entrance to the port. The gun turret was mounted in a 'half moon' shape, thus lending to the name of the club Consequently, the clubhouse is referred to as 'the Wall', 'the Poolbeg', 'the Battery', or 'the Half Moon'

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/20
100 f11 tripod . Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Rusty Winch and Poolbeg Lighthouse


Rusty Winch and Poolbeg Lighthouse

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.

This rusty winch was used to hoist up provisions from a boat for the lighthouse keepers.  In the background is Howth Head.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 24mm
1/10
100 f11 tripod . Neutral density filter

 

 


 
The Old and the New


The Old and The New

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.

At 8am , the first of the ferries started leaving the port.   First off the mark was Irish Ferries.  I like the contrast of the centuries-old winch in the foreground and the sleek modern ship setting sail out of Dublin port.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/100
100 f4 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Poolbeg Lighthouse


Poolbeg Lighthouse

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.   It was a good time to take some shots as the spot is usually very busy with people out jogging and walking.   Even though I was there very early there were still quite a few people about for their early morning walk/jog.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/30
100 f11 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Poolbeg Lighthouse


Poolbeg Lighthouse

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.   It was a good time to take some shots as the spot is usually very busy with people out jogging and walking.   Even though I was there very early there were still quite a few people about.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/25
100 f10 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Sail Away


Sail Away

2nd March 2012

Great South Wall, Poolbeg, Dublin.

Got up at 530am this morning and hit the road for Dublin.  I checked the skies before I left the house and they looked clear.  Was aiming to be up here at 7am.  But I could have done with arriving a little earlier as it was a long walk down from the car.   It was a good time to take some shots as the spot is usually very busy with people out jogging and walking.   Even though I was there very early there were still quite a few people about.   This was my last shot of the morning, the 2 ferries sailing out from Dublin port at approx 8am.  Irish Ferries and Stena Sealink.

The Great South Wall (also sometimes called the South Bull Wall), at the Port of Dublin, extends from Ringsend nearly four kms out into Dublin Bay.

Brief History of the Great South Wall and Poolbeg Lighthouse:   The approach to Dublin Port had long been plagued by sandbars obstructing the entrance and also by frequent squalls and stormy conditions. To alleviate the situation, in 1716, the Ballast Office (predecessor of the Dublin Port Company) commenced the city's most ambitious civic construction to date. From the harbour at Ringsend to Poolbeg Lighthouse a sea wall of 3 miles (5 Km) in length, the world's longest at the time, was built. Initially the Great South Wall was composed of wooden piles on the outside filled in between with gravel. It soon became necessary to strengthen the walls with granite taken across Dublin Bay on barges from the quarries in Dalkey.

The work was more or less finished in 1786. Meanwhile at the Head of the Piles‚ (the end of the wall) an island of masonry was laid down on which Poolbeg Lighthouse was built. It was ready in 1767 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. The Poolbeg lighthouse was completed two years later. It originally stood alone out at sea but a wall then built back inland from the lighthouse to connect with the existing causeway, a feat completed in 1796 under the direction of Viscount Ranelagh. It was the world's longest sea-wall at the time of its building and still remains one of the longest in Europe. It faces the later-built Bull Wall.

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 17mm
1/125
100 f4 Neutral density filter

 

 


 
Poolbeg Lighthouse, Dublin

Poolbeg Lighthouse, Dublin.

2nd January, 2012,

Poolbeg Lighthouse in Dublin Bay was built in 1768 and initially operated on candlepower (reputedly the first in the world to do so) but changed to oil in 1786. It was re-designed and re-built into its present form in 1820. . Situated at the end of a stone pier, it overlooks Dublin Bay.

There were a few fisherman around the lighthouse, hoping to catch something. It was a wonderful spot to watch the big ships come in, and sail out. There was an amazing view of Howth, Dun Laoghaire and of course, Dublin Port.
This was my first time here, but plan to make a return trip in the next few weeks..

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D Canon 17-40mm 40mm
1/10ecs 100 f10 Graduated filter (Cokin)

 

 


 
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