Mellifont Abbey
Woodland Wonders
Written by EC
Friday, 27 September 2013 00:00
PDF Print E-mail

Woodland Wonders

27th Sept 2013

Mellifont Abbey, County Louth

img4696


 


Last Updated on Friday, 27 September 2013 20:20
 
Mellifont Abbey1
Written by EC
Thursday, 18 April 2013 00:00
PDF Print E-mail

Mellifont Abbey 1

16 April 2013

Mellifont, County Louth

This was taken at the 11th Century ruins of the Cistercian monastery at Mellifont on an outing with Mid Louth camera club.  This is a long exposure .  The ruins were lit up at intervals by Richie and Teddy using speedlites.   They ran around the ruins , and in between the flashes , we covered our lens with black card to avoid polluting the images with stray light

180413_Landscapes_Mellifont __Mellifont1_160413_4_img4925

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon EOS 6D
Canon17-40mm 26mm
178secs
100
f8

 


Last Updated on Sunday, 28 April 2013 10:27
 
Spring has Sprung
Written by EC
Thursday, 18 April 2013 00:00
PDF Print E-mail

Spring has Sprung

On the way out to Mellifont Abbey to do a shoot with Mid Louth Camera club, I spotted this daffodil at the side of the road.  Back-lit by the sun, it was waving at me to take a photo..

16 April 2013

Mellifont, County Louth

180413_Landscapes_Mellifont __SpringHasSprung_160413_4_img4847

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon EOS 6D
Canon17-40mm

400
f5.6

 


Last Updated on Sunday, 28 April 2013 10:28
 
Mellifont Abbey 2
Written by EC
Thursday, 18 April 2013 00:00
PDF Print E-mail

Mellifont Abbey 2

16 April 2013

Mellifont, County Louth

This was taken at the 11th Century ruins of the Cistercian monastery at Mellifont on an outing with Mid Louth camera club.  Steel wool is lit and twirled round and round by a volunteer.  This effect was achieved using a long exposure of 280 secs with the camera set on a tripod, and focused in advance

180413_Landscapes_Mellifont __Mellifont2_160413_4_img4914

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon EOS 6D
Canon17-40mm
280secs
400
f5.6

 


Last Updated on Sunday, 28 April 2013 10:27
 
Mellifont Abbey3
Written by EC
Thursday, 18 April 2013 00:00
PDF Print E-mail

Mellifont Abbey 3

16 April 2013

Mellifont, County Louth

This was taken at the 11th Century ruins of the Cistercian monastery at Mellifont on an outing with Mid Louth camera club.  This is a long exposure .  The ruins were lit up at intervals by Richie and Teddy using speedlites. Blue gel was used on one of the speedlites to achieve the blue effect at the front.  They ran around  lighting up the ruins, and in between the flashes , we covered our lens with black card to avoid polluting the images with stray light

180413_Landscapes_Mellifont __Mellifont3_160413_4_img4931

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon EOS 6D
Canon17-40mm 26mm
282secs
100
f8

 


Last Updated on Sunday, 28 April 2013 10:26
 
Mellifont Abbey

 

Mellifont Abbey, Tullyallen, County Louth

24th April 2012

Mellifont Abbey was one of the wealthiest and most influential monastic houses in medieval Ireland.

Mellifont Abbey is situated in a tranquil valley on the banks of the River Mattock, a tributary of the River Boyne.  The Abbey derives its name from the Latin Font Mellis meaning "fountain of honey". Many medieval monasteries founded by continental orders bore Latin names.  Mellifont is the only one that survives as a current placename in Ireland.

St Malachy, Archbishop of Armagh , along with a community of Irish and French monks, founded Mellifont Abbey in 1142 on lands granted by donogh O'Carroll, King of Oriel.  It was the first Cistercian monastery established in Ireland and over 20 other cistercian houses were founded directly or indirectly from it.  Mellifont also became one of the wealthiest abbeys in Ireland with vast holdings of land in the fertile Boyne Valley.

Although the remains of the Abbey are fragmentary, Mellifont is historically and architecturally significant.  It was the first abbey in Ireland to be laid out according to the European cloistral plan- buildings constructed around a central open space.   Its distinguishing feature is an octagonal lavabo  ( seen in the photo) , constructed about 1200, which functioned as a place for the monks to wash their hands in a symbolic gesture as a preparation for prayer

 

 

Camera Lens Focal Length Shutter speed Iso Aperture Additional details
Canon 50D 17-40mm
31
1/4
100
f11